Read More About It @ The Brickell Library: Sleep & Health

Did you know that sleep is important to your health?   According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH): National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute “Getting enough quality sleep at the right times can help protect your mental health, physical health, quality of life, and safety.”    It is recommended that adults get 7-8 hours of sleep a night.   Unfortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified inadequate sleep as a public health concern in the United States. In a 2013 Gallop Poll, it was reported that 40% of Americans were not meeting the minimum recommendation of 7 hours of sleep.  Sleep issues are not limited to the United States, globally sleep problems affect up to 45 per cent of the world’s population. Reasons for inadequate sleep run the gamut  from being new parents to obstructive sleep apnea. Not only does a lack of sleep increase the risk of accidents ranging from traffic to workplace, the prevalence of such chronic illnesses as diabetes and hypertension are also linked sleep insufficiency.

What can you do to meet the recommended daily amount of sleep? Adopt healthy sleep habits to help you achieve the goal!
Catesby Ware, Chief of Sleep Medicine of our EVMS Sleep Disorders Center, recommends a regular sleep schedule including “sleeping at the same time on the weekend as during the work week”.  The EVMS Sleep Disorders Center recommends that you talk with your family physician if sleeping trouble persists. Recommendations range from  regular exercise  and not watching a bedroom clock  when you are trying to sleep to limiting naps and not eating a large meal before you go to bed.

Curious to learn more about healthy sleep?  Visit the links below:
Sleep Your Way to a Healthy Life (EVMS Magazine Issue 8.5 Web Exclusive)
Are You Sleep-Deprived? Learn More About Healthy Sleep (MedlinePlus)
In Brief:  Your Guide to Healthy Sleep (NIH: National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute)
Sleep disorders – overview (MedlinePlus)

Discover more about health issues, search Eastern Virginia Medical School’s Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library collections and databases by visiting the library’s website.
This blog is about consumer health topics of interest to the general public and a vehicle to promote the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library and library outreach events.

Ruth M. Smith, MLIS

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Read More About It @ The Brickell Library: Psoriasis

Psoriasis is   the most common auto immune disease and affects up to 7.5 million Americas.  Although scientists continue to focus on a cure the exact causes of this auto immune disease remains a bit of a mystery  “Scientists believe that at least 10 percent of people inherit one or more of the genes that could eventually lead to psoriasis. However, only 2 percent to 3 percent of the population develops the disease.”  In addition to genetic factors, Scientists believe, environmental “triggers” play a pivotal role in developing Psoriasis.  These triggers include skin injuries, medications and  stress.  This non-contagious disease typically first appears between the ages of 15 to 35.   According to the National Psoriasis Foundation there are 5 different types of Psoriasis.  Plaque Psoriasis, the most common form of the illness. Psoriasis is a  chronic disease caused by the over production of new skin cells and their quick arrival to the surface of the skin, a process that  ought to take a monthThe body does not rid itself of these new skin cells, so the new skin cells pile up.   These new skin cells create a plaque on the skin – “itchy or sore patches of thick, red skin with silvery scales”.  Psoriasis often appears on elbows, knees,  back, face, palms, feet and the scalp. Psoriasis can appear on other areas of the body and also can impact  joints – a condition known as  psoriatic arthritis. According to Abby Van Voorhees, MD. Internationally renowned expert in Psoriasis and newly appointed EVMS Chair of Dermatology,  “somewhere between 25% and 40%”  people who have Psoriasis develop Psoriatic Arthritis. There is currently no known cure for Psoriasis or Psoriatic Arthritis,  treatments however,  are available and range from stress management and  Phototherapy to topical creams.

Curious to learn more about Psoriasis visit;
Psoriasis (MedlinePlus)
Psoriasis (CDC)
The National Psoriasis Foundation

Discover more about health issues, search Eastern Virginia Medical School’s Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library collections and databases by visiting the library’s website.
This blog is about consumer health topics of interest to the general public and a vehicle to promote the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library and library outreach events.

Ruth M. Smith, MLIS

 

Posted in Consumer Health, Outreach

Read More About It @ The Brickell Library: Electronic Cigarettes

Electronic Cigarettes,  sometimes referred to as e-cigarettes or nicotine delivery systems, took their place in US market 7 years ago.  These battery operated devices deliver nicotine via vapor (“vaping”) to the user “without the other chemicals produced by burning tobacco leaves”. According to the National Institutes of Health(NIH)Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States”.  Currently the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates electronic cigarettes that are marketed as therapeutic only.  It should be noted however that the FDA has proposed the regulation of all electronic cigarettes by their organization.

Electronic cigarettes have gained a strong foothold in the United States  with 10% of Adult Americans now “vaping”.  Vaping is also gaining  popularity with younger people,  EVMS reports that an “estimated 2 million high-school students and 450,000 middle-school students nationwide are experimenting with vaping”. According to the American Cancer Society, “studies have shown that e-cigarettes can cause short-term lung changes that are much like those caused by regular cigarettes. But long-term health effects are still unclear. This is an active area of research, but the safety of these products is currently unknown”.

EVMS has been awarded a grant to study vaping amongst youth. Curious to learn about the EVMS efforts to learn why teens are vaping?  Read the article  “Up in Smoke Harmful or Harmless?  EVMS Researchers Take on the Vaping Trend” found in the latest issue of our EVMS magazine.

earn more about Electronic Cigarettes by visiting;
E-Cigarettes (Smokefree.gov)
E-Cigarettes and E-hookahs (MedlinePlus)
E-Cigarettes: Questions and Answers (FDA US Food and Drug Administration)

Discover more about health issues, search Eastern Virginia Medical School’s Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library collections and databases by visiting the library’s website.
This blog is about consumer health topics of interest to the general public and a vehicle to promote the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library and library outreach events.

Ruth M. Smith, MLIS

Posted in Uncategorized

Read More About It @ The Brickell Library: Ticks & Your Health

It’s the summer time!  Who doesn’t like to spend time in their yard, or in the woods, fields and mountains of Virginia. The CDC reports ticks can be found “in moist and humid environments, particularly in or near wooded or grassy areas… [in] leaf litter or near shrubs”.  Even in Hampton Roads ticks are a concern.

Ticks are insects who are members of the arachnid family that may be carrying disease. According to the CDC these diseases range from the most common, Lyme Disease, to Southern Tick Associated Rash Illness (STARI).

In order to continue to enjoy spending time with our families and friends outdoors this summer, we should consider protecting ourselves.  Steps to protect ourselves from disease carrying ticks include keeping our lawns mowed, tucking the bottom of our pants into our hiking boots and proper tick identification.

If you do have a tick on your body the CDC recommends the proper way to remove the tick is with tweezers.  While the CDC recommends disposal of the tick , the ODU Biology Department advises to “keep the tick in a plastic bag in your freezer for at least two weeks, and take the tick along to the doctor if any symptoms appear including fever, rash or fatigue”.  Similarly the Virginia Department of Health recommends to keep the tick in alcohol or a plastic bag to give to your physicians if you become ill so that the tick can be easily identified.

Curious to learn more about ticks?  Visit;
What You Need To Know About Ticks (Eastern Virginia Medical School)
Tick Bites (MedlinePlus)
Tick Talk (NIH News in Health)
The staff of the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library wishes you a happy and healthy summer!

Have questions about health topics? Search Eastern Virginia Medical School’s Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library collections and databases by visiting the library’s website at http://www.evms.edu/library.
This blog is about consumer health topics of interest to the general public and a vehicle to promote the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library and library outreach events.

Ruth M. Smith, MLIS

Posted in Consumer Health

 Read More About it @ Brickell Library: Anatomy

Anatomy falls within the field of Biology and may be defined as “the science concerned with the shape, structure and the relationship of parts of organisms”.  The word “Anatomy” is Greek in origins, ana – meaning up and tome meaning cutting.  Anatomy then is naturally linked to dissection. These two words are not interchangeable however, dissection is “the act or process of dissecting or separating”.  Human Anatomy is then the study of the “shape, structure and the relationship of parts of” a human body.

Without doubt human bodies are amazing!  It is via the study of Human Anatomy that we learn astonishing facts about our bodies. For instance; from Nemours Teen Health “If the skin of a typical 150-pound (68-kilogram) adult male were stretched out flat, it would cover about 2 square yards (1.7 square meters) and weigh about 9 pounds (4 kilograms)” or that our digestive system can be 27 feet long!  Learning about human anatomy stretches back thousands of years with the first recorded teaching of human anatomy occurring in Egypt in 275BCE and happens today here at EVMS.

Curious to learn more about the human anatomy? Click on the links below;
The Final Bequest (EVMS Magazine)
Anatomy (MedlinePlus)
Atlas of the Human Body (American Medical Association)

Discover more about health issues, search Eastern Virginia Medical School’s Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library collections and databases by visiting the library’s website at http://www.evms.edu/library.
This blog is about consumer health topics of interest to the general public and a vehicle to promote the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library and library outreach events.

Ruth Smith, MLIS

Posted in Consumer Health, Outreach

Read More About It @ The Brickell Library: It’s Cold Outside! Cold Weather Health Tips

With the first day of Winter behind us, we are still experiencing winter weather. Temperatures in our area of Virginia range from 35 to 48 degrees Fahrenheit during the month of January. Cold weather can impact our health. In 2013, 34 hospitalizations were attributed to “unintentional injuries sustained due to cold weather” per Anne M. Zehner, MPH Epidemiologist, Virginia Department of Health

24 deaths due to cold weather were reported in the United States by NOAA in 2013 none of these deaths occurred in Virginia. Winter injuries are much more common and range from frost bite and hypothermia to carbon monoxide poisoning.

While we are waiting for the weather to warm up how can we be healthy in cold weather?

Read what the EVMS Emergency Medicine Department has to share about cold weather and health;
Cold Weather Tips From EVMS Emergency Medicine

Want to learn more about cold weather health? Click on the links below;
Winter Weather Emergencies (MedlinePlus)
Take Precautions In Extreme Cold Weather (Virginia Department of Health)
Extreme Cold: A Prevention Guide To Promote Your Health and Safety (CDC)
Common Winter Injuries (And How To Prevent Them) (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons)

Discover more about health issues, search Eastern Virginia Medical School’s Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library collections and databases by visiting the library’s website at http://www.evms.edu/library.
This blog is about consumer health topics of interest to the general public and a vehicle to promote the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library and library outreach events.

Ruth Smith, MLIS

Posted in Uncategorized

Read More About It @ The Brickell Library: Ebola

We have been hearing news stories about Ebola daily capturing the attention of the nation. According for the US Center for Disease Control (CDC) the 2014 outbreak of Ebola in the West Africa region is the largest ever recorded.The first reported outbreak of Ebola, also known as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola Fever, was in 1976. The media, along with the CDC has identified 4 cases of Ebola in the US to date.

We have learned that this virus is spread via direct contact with body fluids from someone who is symptomatic. How do we prevent this virus?
Prevention recommendations include from simply staying away from areas experiencing outbreaks, avoiding those infected with Ebola and hand washing to the World Health Organization’s “Listen to and follow directives issued by your country’s respective Ministry of Health”.
In the United States prevention steps currently range from the quarantine of US troops and medical workers returning from the West African region to airport screenings. Drugs are also in development to combat this virus.

Learn what EVMS Infectious Disease experts say about Ebola by visiting;
EVMS Faculty Provide Facts on Ebola

Curious to learn more facts about Ebola? Visit the websites below;
Ebola (MedlinePlus)
Ebola – Frequently Asked Questions (Virginia Department of Health)
Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever (CDC)
Ebola Facts: Where are the most new cases being reported? (New York Times)

Discover more about health issues, search Eastern Virginia Medical School’s Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library collections and databases by visiting the library’s website at http://www.evms.edu/library.

This blog is about consumer health topics of interest to the general public and a vehicle to promote the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library and library outreach events.

Ruth Smith, MLIS

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