Read More About It @ The Brickell Library: Art Therapy

Are you interested in pursuing a career in the mental health field?  One career path that may interest you is Art Therapy.  The American Art Therapy Association  defines Art Therapy as “a mental health profession in which clients, facilitated by the Art Therapist, use art media, the creative process, and the resulting artwork to explore their feelings, reconcile emotional conflicts, foster self-awareness, manage behavior and addictions, develop social skills, improve reality orientation, reduce anxiety, and increase self-esteem.” The field of art therapy began in the 1940s with roots in the fields of art and psychotherapy.  Currently,  the Bureau of Labor reports that “The American Art Therapy Association has about 5,000 members in the United States”.

You will find Art Therapists working in a variety of settings including clinical settings like hospitals and residential facilities in addition to community settings, like private practice, schools and even in museums.  Keeping the variety of work settings in mind, Art Therapists work with a variety of age groups. Art Therapist work with clients who have a variety of mental health issues ranging from traumagrief  and Traumatic Brain Injury to those who have Dementia and  Alzheimer’s along with their caregivers.  It should be noted however “Art Therapy is not only for people experiencing emotional difficulty — it can heighten creativity and enrich life.”  It can help release everyday stresses and no you don’t have to be an artist to benefit from art therapy.

Did you know that EVMS offers both a Graduate Art Therapy and Counseling Program and a Post Master in Art Therapy Program?  Read about  Art therapist and EVMS graduate, Denille Francis,  in the latest EVMS Magazine.

Want to learn more about the art therapy profession? Visit the links below:
EVMS Art Therapy and Counseling
A Brief Guide to the Basic Fundamentals of Art Therapy (Huffington Post)
You’re a what? Art therapist (Bureau of Labor Statistics)
FAQs (Art Therapy Credentials Board, Inc.)

To discover more about health issues and current data, search Eastern Virginia Medical School’s Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library collections and databases by visiting the library’s website.
This blog is about consumer health topics of interest to the general public and a vehicle to promote the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library and library outreach events.

Ruth M. Smith, MLIS

Posted in Art Therapy, Consumer Health, Outreach

Read More About It @ The Brickell Library: Seniors’ Health Issues

Ideally, seniors would receive health care by visiting a geriatrician,  in reality, few MDs are entering the gerontology field.  The fact remains, however, that these seniors will need access to health care providers.  Keeping in mind that according to the United States Census Bureau there will be over 60 million Americans who are 65 and older in 2025, the necessity for healthcare professionals to be familiar with geriatric health issues is paramount. In a 2015 New York Times article, “An Aging Population Without the Doctors to Match”, Marcy Cottrell Houle reported, “Currently, 97 percent of all medical students in the United States do not take a single course in geriatrics.” EVMS through its CareForward Curriculum introduces all of our first-year medical students to geriatric care.  In the EVMS Magazine article, “As Time Goes By”, EVMS Charles F. Burroughs Jr. Endowed Professorial Chair in Family Medicine, Dr. Daniel Bluestein states, “We are teaching our new physicians and re-educating practicing clinicians that senior care is part of the core business of primary care.”  In the same article Dr. Bluestein further shares, “…most people prefer to see the family doctor who has known them for years.  That’s why it’s vital for primary-care physicians to learn how to care for senior patients.”

What seniors’ health issues will physicians see in their offices? Health issues run the gamut from heart disease and Alzheimer’s to the consequences of falls and even for some seniors, opioid addiction.  According to Dr. Robert Palmer, EVMS Chair of Geriatrics and Director of the EVMS Glennan Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, a geriatric assessment is appropriate for seniors suffering from a  chronic health issue and facing two or more health challenges, as outlined in “When a Geriatric Assessment Can Help.”   In the American Family Physician journal article,  “The Geriatric Assessment,” we learn “The geriatric assessment is a multidimensional, multidisciplinary assessment designed to evaluate an older person’s functional ability, physical health, cognition and mental health, and socioenvironmental circumstances.”

Want to schedule a geriatric assessment?  Call our EVMS Glennan Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology directly at (757) 446-7040 or have your health care provider contact the Glennan Center on your behalf. The Glennan Center will bill insurances accepted by the EVMS Medical Group.

Curious to learn more about Senior’s Health Issues? Visit:
Health and Aging (National Institute on Aging)
Seniors (MedlinePlus)
Seniors’ Health (MedlinePlus)

To discover more about health issues and current data, search Eastern Virginia Medical School’s Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library collections and databases by visiting the library’s website.
This blog is about consumer health topics of interest to the general public and a vehicle to promote the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library and library outreach events.

Ruth M. Smith, MLIS

Posted in Uncategorized

Read More About It @ The Brickell Library: Celebrate National Medical Librarians Month 2016 by Reading Fiction!

Did you know that  reading fiction has health benefits? These gains from reading fiction books range from  improving empathy , lowering the risk of dementia  and increasing longevity to improving brain connectivity. With this knowledge of the health benefits of reading fiction and in celebration of National Medical Librarians Month, a request was sent to the Brickell Library staff to recommend titles. Check out the staff picks below!

“The Best Loved Poems of Jacqueline Kennedy-Onassis” by Caroline Kennedy                        I chose a book of poetry titled “The Best Loved Poems of Jacqueline Kennedy-Onassis” by Caroline Kennedy. The book features a mix of adult and children’s poetry by well-known poets such as Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson, E.E. Cummings, and many others. I really enjoyed this book and would recommend this book to others. I’ve already purchased multiple copies to gift.                                                                                                                                                     Natasha Williams, Circulation Assistant

“Cutting for Stone” by Abraham Verghese                                                                                      An incredibly unbelievable, yet realistic family story, epic in scope- the characters and relationship of the woman doctor and her eventual husband is a fabulous love story. I also like that the telling evokes a time and place – Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) over decades and generations. The political turmoil and the culture of its people is enthralling. I went online to explore more about Ethiopia, because the story enchanted me so. The practice of medicine, integral to the plot, is fascinating and moving. You won’t want to put it down once you start reading.                                                                                                                            Ann Moriarty, Circulation Assistant

“The Doomsday Book” by Connie Willis                                                                                             The Doomsday Book is an award winning novel written by science fiction writer Connie Willis.  This book will appeal to science fiction fans and historical fiction readers alike.  In this riveting novel, we follow Kivrin Engles, an Oxford time-travelling history student, while she experiences the Black Death first hand. Kirvin’s arrival in 1348 England during the Christmas season was unplanned and a result of a technological error compliments of a gravely ill colleague. While Kivrin deals with the Bubonic Plague an Influenza epidemic ravages her England of 2054.  Of course,there’s a bit of romantic love in this book, too.  For her stellar efforts, author Connie Willis rightfully won the 1993 Nebula and Hugo both for best novel.  Read this – you won’t be disappointed!                                                            Ruth Smith, Outreach Services Coordinator

“The Gilly Salt Sisters” by Tiffany Baker                                                                                        The Gilly sisters were duty-bound to divine the town’s future by throwing salt into the December’s Eve bonfire. While Jo continues scraping salt off the marshes, Claire marries into the town’s most prominent family and uses her new position to turn the residents against the Gilly salt.  This 2013 effort by Tiffany Baker is a complex tale of family, betrayal, guilt and revenge. Much of the novel is backstory, which I felt slowed the narrative’s pace, leaving a hurried resolution and predictable epilogue. Still, it’s a richly woven tale with intriguing characters, lushly described scenery, and a finely tuned relationship between two sisters which helps cover the inconsistent storytelling. I leave it up to the reader to decide whether there is redemption in the end.                                          Carolyn Gilliland, Inter Library Loan Assistant

“Wonder” by R.J. Palacio                                                                                                                  The fictional book I’d like to recommend is actually a middle grade book.  “Wonder”, by R.J.Palacio, is about a boy named August who has a facial disfigurement due to a complex medical history.  The story follows him as he starts a new school and navigates his feelings as well as the perceptions of his schoolmates during this transition.  I highly recommend this book because the reader gets to experience what August is thinking and going through since the story is told in his perspective.  It’s a wonderful story of how we can overcome misconceptions and learn to be empathetic towards others.                      Esther Sarino, Clinical Medical Librarian

Curious to learn more about fictional reading and health benefits?  Visit the links below: Reading Helps You Forget About Your Worries And Relax (Mayo Clinic)
Want To Read Other’s Thoughts? Try Reading Fiction (National Public Radio)
Your Brain On Fiction (New York Times)

To discover more about health issues and current data, search Eastern Virginia Medical School’s Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library collections and databases by visiting the library’s website.
This blog is about consumer health topics of interest to the general public and a vehicle to promote the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library and library outreach events.

Ruth M. Smith, MLIS and Esther May Sarino, MLIS

Posted in Uncategorized

Read More About It @ The Brickell Library: Sleep & Health

Did you know that sleep is important to your health?   According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH): National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute “Getting enough quality sleep at the right times can help protect your mental health, physical health, quality of life, and safety.”    It is recommended that adults get 7-8 hours of sleep a night.   Unfortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified inadequate sleep as a public health concern in the United States. In a 2013 Gallop Poll, it was reported that 40% of Americans were not meeting the minimum recommendation of 7 hours of sleep.  Sleep issues are not limited to the United States, globally sleep problems affect up to 45 per cent of the world’s population. Reasons for inadequate sleep run the gamut  from being new parents to obstructive sleep apnea. Not only does a lack of sleep increase the risk of accidents ranging from traffic to workplace, the prevalence of such chronic illnesses as diabetes and hypertension are also linked sleep insufficiency.

What can you do to meet the recommended daily amount of sleep? Adopt healthy sleep habits to help you achieve the goal!
Catesby Ware, Chief of Sleep Medicine of our EVMS Sleep Disorders Center, recommends a regular sleep schedule including “sleeping at the same time on the weekend as during the work week”.  The EVMS Sleep Disorders Center recommends that you talk with your family physician if sleeping trouble persists. Recommendations range from  regular exercise  and not watching a bedroom clock  when you are trying to sleep to limiting naps and not eating a large meal before you go to bed.

Curious to learn more about healthy sleep?  Visit the links below:
Sleep Your Way to a Healthy Life (EVMS Magazine Issue 8.5 Web Exclusive)
Are You Sleep-Deprived? Learn More About Healthy Sleep (MedlinePlus)
In Brief:  Your Guide to Healthy Sleep (NIH: National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute)
Sleep disorders – overview (MedlinePlus)

Discover more about health issues, search Eastern Virginia Medical School’s Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library collections and databases by visiting the library’s website.
This blog is about consumer health topics of interest to the general public and a vehicle to promote the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library and library outreach events.

Ruth M. Smith, MLIS

Posted in Consumer Health, Outreach | Tagged ,

Read More About It @ The Brickell Library: Psoriasis

Psoriasis is   the most common auto immune disease and affects up to 7.5 million Americas.  Although scientists continue to focus on a cure the exact causes of this auto immune disease remains a bit of a mystery  “Scientists believe that at least 10 percent of people inherit one or more of the genes that could eventually lead to psoriasis. However, only 2 percent to 3 percent of the population develops the disease.”  In addition to genetic factors, Scientists believe, environmental “triggers” play a pivotal role in developing Psoriasis.  These triggers include skin injuries, medications and  stress.  This non-contagious disease typically first appears between the ages of 15 to 35.   According to the National Psoriasis Foundation there are 5 different types of Psoriasis.  Plaque Psoriasis, the most common form of the illness. Psoriasis is a  chronic disease caused by the over production of new skin cells and their quick arrival to the surface of the skin, a process that  ought to take a monthThe body does not rid itself of these new skin cells, so the new skin cells pile up.   These new skin cells create a plaque on the skin – “itchy or sore patches of thick, red skin with silvery scales”.  Psoriasis often appears on elbows, knees,  back, face, palms, feet and the scalp. Psoriasis can appear on other areas of the body and also can impact  joints – a condition known as  psoriatic arthritis. According to Abby Van Voorhees, MD. Internationally renowned expert in Psoriasis and newly appointed EVMS Chair of Dermatology,  “somewhere between 25% and 40%”  people who have Psoriasis develop Psoriatic Arthritis. There is currently no known cure for Psoriasis or Psoriatic Arthritis,  treatments however,  are available and range from stress management and  Phototherapy to topical creams.

Curious to learn more about Psoriasis visit;
Psoriasis (MedlinePlus)
Psoriasis (CDC)
The National Psoriasis Foundation

Discover more about health issues, search Eastern Virginia Medical School’s Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library collections and databases by visiting the library’s website.
This blog is about consumer health topics of interest to the general public and a vehicle to promote the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library and library outreach events.

Ruth M. Smith, MLIS

 

Posted in Consumer Health, Outreach

Read More About It @ The Brickell Library: Electronic Cigarettes

Electronic Cigarettes,  sometimes referred to as e-cigarettes or nicotine delivery systems, took their place in US market 7 years ago.  These battery operated devices deliver nicotine via vapor (“vaping”) to the user “without the other chemicals produced by burning tobacco leaves”. According to the National Institutes of Health(NIH)Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States”.  Currently the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates electronic cigarettes that are marketed as therapeutic only.  It should be noted however that the FDA has proposed the regulation of all electronic cigarettes by their organization.

Electronic cigarettes have gained a strong foothold in the United States  with 10% of Adult Americans now “vaping”.  Vaping is also gaining  popularity with younger people,  EVMS reports that an “estimated 2 million high-school students and 450,000 middle-school students nationwide are experimenting with vaping”. According to the American Cancer Society, “studies have shown that e-cigarettes can cause short-term lung changes that are much like those caused by regular cigarettes. But long-term health effects are still unclear. This is an active area of research, but the safety of these products is currently unknown”.

EVMS has been awarded a grant to study vaping amongst youth. Curious to learn about the EVMS efforts to learn why teens are vaping?  Read the article  “Up in Smoke Harmful or Harmless?  EVMS Researchers Take on the Vaping Trend” found in the latest issue of our EVMS magazine.

earn more about Electronic Cigarettes by visiting;
E-Cigarettes (Smokefree.gov)
E-Cigarettes and E-hookahs (MedlinePlus)
E-Cigarettes: Questions and Answers (FDA US Food and Drug Administration)

Discover more about health issues, search Eastern Virginia Medical School’s Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library collections and databases by visiting the library’s website.
This blog is about consumer health topics of interest to the general public and a vehicle to promote the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library and library outreach events.

Ruth M. Smith, MLIS

Posted in Uncategorized

Read More About It @ The Brickell Library: Ticks & Your Health

It’s the summer time!  Who doesn’t like to spend time in their yard, or in the woods, fields and mountains of Virginia. The CDC reports ticks can be found “in moist and humid environments, particularly in or near wooded or grassy areas… [in] leaf litter or near shrubs”.  Even in Hampton Roads ticks are a concern.

Ticks are insects who are members of the arachnid family that may be carrying disease. According to the CDC these diseases range from the most common, Lyme Disease, to Southern Tick Associated Rash Illness (STARI).

In order to continue to enjoy spending time with our families and friends outdoors this summer, we should consider protecting ourselves.  Steps to protect ourselves from disease carrying ticks include keeping our lawns mowed, tucking the bottom of our pants into our hiking boots and proper tick identification.

If you do have a tick on your body the CDC recommends the proper way to remove the tick is with tweezers.  While the CDC recommends disposal of the tick , the ODU Biology Department advises to “keep the tick in a plastic bag in your freezer for at least two weeks, and take the tick along to the doctor if any symptoms appear including fever, rash or fatigue”.  Similarly the Virginia Department of Health recommends to keep the tick in alcohol or a plastic bag to give to your physicians if you become ill so that the tick can be easily identified.

Curious to learn more about ticks?  Visit;
What You Need To Know About Ticks (Eastern Virginia Medical School)
Tick Bites (MedlinePlus)
Tick Talk (NIH News in Health)
The staff of the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library wishes you a happy and healthy summer!

Have questions about health topics? Search Eastern Virginia Medical School’s Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library collections and databases by visiting the library’s website at http://www.evms.edu/library.
This blog is about consumer health topics of interest to the general public and a vehicle to promote the Edward E. Brickell Medical Sciences Library and library outreach events.

Ruth M. Smith, MLIS

Posted in Consumer Health